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Who are we?
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The Institute for International Medical Education was established in 1999 and has been entrusted with the development of "global minimum essential (core) requirements" to be required by physicians throughout the world, as well as the task of collecting global information on different aspects of education of the medical profession. After testing these "essentials" in a few leading medical schools, they will be offered to the academic community as a tool to secure a quality of physicians' education worldwide. They can also serve for international evaluation and recognition of quality medical education programs. Three committees composed of medical experts from around the globe supervise the work of IIME: the Core Committee, the Steering Committee and the Advisory Committee. Our offices are located in suburban White Plains, New York.
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China Medical Board President Dr. M. Roy Schwarz and IIME Director Dr. Andrzej Wojtczak outside the new offices of the IIME
February 2000

How were we established?
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On June 9, 1999, the Board of Trustees of China Medical Board of New York decided to establish an institute that would deal with the global issues of medical education. The China Medical Board began its operations in 1914 as a division of The Rockefeller Foundation. In 1928, the China Medical Board of New York, Inc. has functioned as an independent foundation. The Board has devoted its funds largely to supporting health personnel and in particular medical education in China and in several East and Southeast Asian nations.


Why Minimum Essential Requirements?
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Different multilateral agreements are broadly opening doors to global mobility and are encouraging the development of common educational standards, mutual recognition of diplomas and liberalization of processes by which professionals are allowed to practice. Although the medical curriculum is astonishingly consistent throughout the world, there are no common content standards or essential requirements to be used worldwide. Therefore, essential requirements and standards in medical education of universal relevance are not only realistic but also urgently needed. They should include the sciences that are basic to medicine, clinical experiences, knowledge, skills, competencies and ethical values. These are the core elements of the training of physicians and are fundamental to the practice of health care worldwide. These essential requirements to be embedded in medical curriculum represent only a portion of the educational content of the medical curriculum, since each country, region and medical school has unique needs that the educational curriculum should address, such as socioeconomic factors or a particular country's cultural context.

Copyright © 1999-2006   Institute for International Medical Education.
Unauthorized reproduction strictly prohibited.